One Internet for All - WCAG 2.1 & ADA Compliance

Websites Built and Maintained with Inclusion in Mind

In 1990, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was passed which required businesses to make accommodations to people with disabilities. This was done so they could enjoy the same access to opportunities and advantages available to people without disabilities. However, as we are sure you’re aware of, the internet in 1990 was a distant relative to what it is like today. As time progressed, ADA legislation never seemed to keep up with the rapid digitalization of our world. This has left countless online businesses grasping at thin air – wondering what they need to do in order fulfill their legal requirement of becoming and staying ADA compliant. Are you one of those businesses?

Here at iMedia, we understand what needs to be done in order to become ADA compliant. We interpret and then proceed based on the most up to date universal web accessibility standards – the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1. We acknowledge the four main principles of accessibility laid out within WCAG 2.1. Additionally, we know the requirements that fall under each respective principle along with the conformance level used to grade them (A – minimum accessibility level, AA – more accessible, and AAA – even more accessible):

  • Perceivable: Information and user interface components must be presentable to users in ways they can perceive. This means that users must be able to perceive the information being presented – it can't be invisible to each of their senses.
    • Text Alternatives (ex. Adding alt text tags to images: A)
    • Time-Based Media (ex. Adding captions for videos: A)
    • Adaptable (ex. Using correctly nested headings: A)
    • Distinguishable (ex. Scalable text: AA)
 
  • Operable: User interface components and navigation must be operable. The interface cannot require interaction that a user cannot perform
    • Keyboard Accessible (ex. Content can be operated through a keyboard/keyboard interface: A)
    • Enough Time (ex. Designing functions that are non-time dependent: A)
    • Seizures (ex. Ensuring the flicker that violates the flash thresholds is not caused by the content itself: A)
    • Navigable (ex. Using semantic HTML so the sequential navigation order of the web content is determined: A)
    • Input Modalities (ex. Accessible label names used properly and match text on the site)
 
  • Understandable: Information and the operation of a user interface must be understandable. Users must be able to understand the information as well as the operation of the user interface.
    • Readable (ex. Stating the language so browsers can display characters and scripts correctly: A)
    • Predictable (ex. Indicating when a link will open in a new tab: A)
    • Input Assistance (ex. Informing users of input errors: A)
 
  • Robust: Content must be robust enough that it can be interpreted reliably by a wide variety of user agents, including assistive technologies. As technologies and user agents evolve, the content should remain accessible.
    • Compatible (ex. Not using depreciated tags or attributes: A)

2019 saw 2,235 new website lawsuits filed in federal court.

Usable Net



In the USA, roughly 56.7 million people have a disability, according to a broad definition of disability, with more than half of them reporting the disability was severe.

US Census Bureau
Compliance-LP

How Can We Help You?

iMedia has a system we follow with a proven track record of success:
  1. UNDERSTAND: We spend the time reading and understanding the current digital accessibility guidelines.
  2. IDENTIFY: We perform both automated scans and manual reviews of your website. We find out where you are falling behind and what we need to do in order to fix it. We process the results from both audits and come up with a remediation plan.
  3. EXECUTE: We make the necessary changes to your website’s code. Even if you don’t think you see anything on the surface, there are a significant amount of people who are permanently (or temporarily) disabled in one way or another and that audience is important from a revenue growth perspective – not just a legal one.
  4. DEVELOP:  We develop a maintenance plan for your website moving forward. This ensures that what we changed stays the way it is and that moving forward your website is maintained with WCAG 2.1 and ADA compliance constantly in mind.

2019 saw 2,235 new website lawsuits filed in federal court.

Usable Net



In the USA, roughly 56.7 million people have a disability, according to a broad definition of disability, with more than half of them reporting the disability was severe.

US Census Bureau